Tuesday Tips for Caregivers – How to be an Effective Long-Distance Caregiver

Tuesday Tips for Caregivers – How to be an Effective Long-Distance Caregiver

Tuesday Tips for Caregivers - How to be an Effective Long-Distance Caregiver

Tuesday Tips for Caregivers – How to be an Effective Long-Distance Caregiver

In today’s world, many families and it’s members are spread apart in different cities or states. And we are not always able to provide the hands-on care we would like. While living at a distance can complicate caregiving, there are resources to help.

You can take many steps to be an effective long-distance caregiver. For example:

  • Schedule a family meeting. Gather family and friends involved in your loved one’s care in person, by phone or by Web chat. Discuss your goals, air feelings and divide up duties. Appoint someone to summarize the decisions made and distribute notes after the meeting. Be sure to include the loved one in need of care in the decision-making process.
  • Get organized. Compile notes about your loved one’s medical condition and any legal or financial issues. Include contact numbers, insurance information, account numbers and other important details.
  • Research your loved one’s illness and treatment. This will help you understand what your loved one is going through, the course of the illness, what you can do to prevent crises and how to assist with disease management. It might also make it easier to talk to your loved one’s doctors.
  • Keep in touch with your loved one’s providers. In coordination with your loved one and his or her other caregivers, schedule conference calls with doctors or other health care providers to keep on top of changes in your loved one’s health. Be sure to have your loved one sign a release allowing the doctor to discuss medical issues with you — and keep a backup copy in your files.
  • Ask your loved one’s friends for help. Stay in touch with your loved one’s friends and neighbors. If possible, ask them to regularly check in on your loved one. They might be able to help you understand what’s going on with your loved one on a daily basis.
  • Seek professional help. If necessary, hire someone to help with meals, personal care and other needs. A geriatric care manager or social worker also might be helpful in organizing your loved one’s care.
  • Plan for emergencies. Set aside time and money in case you need to make unexpected visits to help your loved one. Consider inquiring about taking unpaid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act.
  • Stay in touch. Try sending your loved one digital movies of yourself. Send cards. Set a time each day or week for phone calls with your loved one.

To contact ElderCare at Home

Please call us at (888) 285-0093. Thanks for joining us in today’s Tuesday Tips for Caregivers and we’ll see you again next week!